AGU Fall Meeting 2018

The AGU Fall Meeting 2018 is approaching fast. Before you all finish up your schedules, we want to draw your attention to the presentations from our ATTO team!

Tuesday, 11 December

Wednesday, 12 December

Friday, 14 December

This year’s AGU Fall Meeting takes place from December 10 – 14 at the Convention Center in Washington D.C. Hope to see you all there! If you can’t make it to AGU, be sure to follow us on Social Media to get a glimpse into the conference and ATTO’s presence there.

 

EGU 2019

Are you heading to the EGU 2019? If the answer is ‘yes’ we might have just the right session for you!

Next year, some members of the ATTO team are convening a session at next years EGU titled “Intact Amazon forest – a natural laboratory of global significance” (BG2.4/AS3.35/HS11.64/SSS10.12). This session aims at bringing together scientists who investigate the functioning of the Amazon and comparable intact forest landscapes across spatial and temporal scales by means of observational, modeling, and theoretical studies. Particularly welcome are also presentations of new, interdisciplinary approaches and techniques. We specifically invite contributions from a great variety of projects investigating the Amazon and its significance for the Earth System and hope many of you will submit abstracts to the session!

EGU 2019 is taking place from  April 7 to 12 in Vienna, Austria, as usual. Travel Grants are offered, for example for Early Career Scientists.

Hope to see you there to gain new insights, inspire new approaches and collaborations and share our passion for performing research in this unique ecosystem with global importance.

 

ATTO Newsletter #1

The first edition of our new ATTO Newsletter was just released.

Four times a year, the newsletter will keep you up-to-date on everything that happened in the past several months, such as new scientific articles that have been published, infrastructural updates and meeting that happened. In addition, we provide info on upcoming conferences with abstract submission deadlines or an overview of presentations of ATTO data. And it is also a platform to share some of the stunning photos from the Amazon around the ATTO site, especially to those who don’t follow our Instagram.

To receive the newsletter, please subscribe to our mailing list, subscribe to the RSS feed or follow us on social media. All newsletters will be archived here on the website as well.

Enjoy reading!

New Publication: Air turbulence characteristics in and above the Amazon rainforest canopy

One of our major goals at ATTO is understanding how the Amazon rainforest interacts with the atmosphere above. This includes studying how the characteristics of the air change within and above the tree canopy in terms of atmospheric turbulence. The strength of the wind and the thickness of the canopy determine, among other things, how well the air can mix and to what degree gases from the atmosphere may reach the forest floor and vice versa.

In a new study, the scientists were looking into these processes at two Amazon sites, including ATTO. They found that the lowermost air-layer from the forest floor to about half the tree height is largely decoupled from the air in the upper part of the canopy and above. That is an important finding, as this process may limit the extent to which plant-emitted gases are transported out of the forest canopy into the atmosphere above.
Raoni Aquino and co-authors now published their findings in a new study called “Air turbulence characteristics at multiple sites in and above the Amazon rainforest canopy” in the journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Volume 260-261.

New Publication: Variability of black and brown carbon concentrations

We are currently in the middle of the dry season in the central Amazon basin, where ATTO is located. This time of year is always characterized by lots of biomass burnings, both natural and anthropogenic. Fires produce aerosols, such as black and brown carbon. But the situation isn’t the same every year.

Our researchers studied the concentration of light-absorbing aerosol particles at ATTO over a 5-year period from 2012 to 2017. They found that the aerosol concentration increased significantly during the El Niño of 2015-2016. During that time, the dry season lasted longer than normal and forest and agricultural fires occurred much more frequently compared to other years. The fires produce large amounts of black and brown carbon. These are able to absorb radiation, which has two important effects: firstly, it warms the atmosphere, and secondly, less radiation is able to reach the canopy and forest floor, thus affecting the primary production of the forest. That means that a climatic shift to warmer and drier conditions and potentially stronger and more frequent El Niños could affect the Amazon rainforest in the future.

First-author Jorge Saturno just published the study in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP) Issue 18. It is available Open Access and thus freely available for everyone.