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Welcome

Welcome to our website for ATTO, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory – an Amazon research project.

This research site is located in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, about 150 km north of Manaus. It is run together by scientists from Germany and Brazil. Its aim is to continuously record meteorological, chemical and biological data, such as the concentration of greenhouses gases. With the help of these data, we hope to gain insights into how the Amazon interacts with the overlying atmosphere and the soil below. Because this region is of such importance to the global climate, it is vital to get a better understanding of these complex processes. Only then will we be able to make more accurate climate predictions.

Have a look around on our website to learn more about the research performed at ATTO and in labs and offices around the world. Please note that the website is still under constructions and more content will be added. So be sure to check back soon! You can also follow us on Social Media to get an insight into the daily lives of the ATTO scientists and stay up-to-date on all the latest news and events!

Latest News

You may have noticed that the front page of our website got a new look recently. This is because in addition to project news, we now also have a blog! It is called "Voices from the Amazon", and here you will hear directly from our ATTO team. You can find it right below the "News section" on the front page. We are kicking things off with a very special post for today's Day for Woman and Girls in Science.

Latest Blog

Hello together. My Name is Denis Leppla and I am working at ATTO since 2017 with rather simple instruments for filtering aerosol particles from the air. There we analyze them with a mass spectrometer at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz. With this analysis, we can get insights into the chemical composition of aerosol particles and identify hundreds of different compounds.

News

You may have noticed that the front page of our website got a new look recently. This is because in addition to project news, we now also have a blog! It is called "Voices from the Amazon", and here you will hear directly from our ATTO team. You can find it right below the "News section" on the front page. We are kicking things off with a very special post for today's Day for Woman and Girls in Science.
Fungal spore emissions are an important contributor to biogenic aerosols, but we have yet to understand under what conditions fungi release their spores. Nina Löbs and co-authors developed a new technique to measure emissions from single organisms and tested this out at ATTO and with controlled lab experiments. They published their results in the Open Access Journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques.
Convective storms often occur in the tropics and have the potential to disturb the lower part of the atmosphere. They might even improve the venting of trace gases out of the forest canopy into the atmosphere above. To better understand these processes, Maurício Oliveira and co-authors used the infrastructure at ATTO to study storm outflows during nighttime. They published the results in a new paper in the Open Access Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.
The fourth newsletter is here! Get all the latest updates from the ATTO project, such as new publications, upcoming conferences, and a media digest.
The PhD project is part of the International Max Planck Research School for Global Biogeochemical Cycles (IMPRS-gBGC) at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. In cooperation with the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry houses a unique and flexible research program that grants German and foreign students a broad selection of learning opportunities while still maintaining a research focus. The IMPRS-gBGC offers a PhD program specializing in global biogeochemistry and related Earth System sciences. Supervisors of the PhD project are Dr. Jost Lavric and Prof. Susan Trumbore.
Again this year, we will be present at the AGU Fall Meeting 2019 with some interesting presentations that cover a range of topics! If you are in San Francisco next week, you can learn out more about the latest Amazon research from ATTO make sure to put the following items on your schedule:

Blog: Voices from the Amazon

Hello together. My Name is Denis Leppla and I am working at ATTO since 2017 with rather simple instruments for filtering aerosol particles from the air. There we analyze them with a mass spectrometer at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz. With this analysis, we can get insights into the chemical composition of aerosol particles and identify hundreds of different compounds.
On today's International Women in Science Day, we want to shine the spotlight on the incredible women in our project. Sue, Samara and Mira tell their inspiring stories of why they wanted to becomes scientists. They share memories of teachers, parents, book and childlike curiosity. They also talk about how they got to where they are today, and what it took to have successful careers as women in science.
Hi, my name is Ana Caroline, and I currently work at the ATTO Project for the INPA and the MPI-BGC. At ATTO I work as a scientific assistant for the Gerd Gleixner group.
My name is Sebastian Donner and I am a PhD student working in the satellite remote sensing group at the Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie in Mainz. I studied Meteorology in Mainz and then stayed here to obtain my Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Already back then, I was really fascinated by the atmosphere’s composition.
Hey, this is Sam Jones! Earlier in 2019 I finally moved to Manaus and took a job at INPA. I say finally because I had flirted with the idea for quite some time.  Now I often get asked the enduringly difficult question “What are you doing here?”. The short answer is that I’m working as a soil ‘biogeochemist’ on the ATTO project.
My name is Flavia Durgante and I am a Postdoc in the Wetland Ecology Group of Dr. Florian Wittmann at the Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Germany. At ATTO, our project focuses on water. We're analyzing water isotopes from different sources such as rain, soil deeps, rivers and xylem water from trees in different habitats. Additionally, we want to recognize climatic signals as oxygen isotopes in the tree rings.