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Welcome to our website for ATTO, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory – an Amazon research project.

This research site is located in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, about 150 km north of Manaus. It is run together by scientists from Germany and Brazil. Its aim is to continuously record meteorological, chemical and biological data, such as the concentration of greenhouses gases. With the help of these data, we hope to gain insights into how the Amazon interacts with the overlying atmosphere and the soil below. Because this region is of such importance to the global climate, it is vital to get a better understanding of these complex processes. Only then will we be able to make more accurate climate predictions.

Have a look around on our website to learn more about the research performed at ATTO and in labs and offices around the world. Please note that the website is still under constructions and more content will be added. So be sure to check back soon! You can also follow us on Social Media to get an insight into the daily lives of the ATTO scientists and stay up-to-date on all the latest news and events!

Latest News

The PhD projects are part of the International Max Planck Research School for Global Biogeochemical Cycles (IMPRS-gBGC) at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. The focus on plant traits in tropical trees (project 1) and organic markers and seasonal metabolims (project 2). Apply by September 6.

Latest Blog

My name is Stefan! I’m a meteorologist and I have been working on the ATTO project since 2010. I heard about the Amazon rainforest for the first time in my childhood. From that moment on I was really enthusiastic about this abundant ecosystem and passionate to get to know it. Several years later, in 2005, I did an internship at the UFSCAR University in the state of São Paulo. Afterward, I had my first opportunity to get in direct touch with the Amazon. Five years later I got a great opportunity to join the newborn ATTO project. This has let me directly work and live in the Amazon – fantastic!

News

AGU Fall Meeting 2020 meeting will be held virtually during the original 7-11 December dates. We want to draw your attention to one session in particular: Tropical forests under a changing environment. Abstract submission deadline is 29 July.
Two Amazonian local activists Natalina do Carmo and Milena Raquel Tupinambá, visited ATTO last year. Brazilian filmmaker Barbara Marcel went with them to capture the exchange between the scientists, who study the forest, and the communities who call the forest their home. You can now see what she discovered in a video installation called “Ciné-Cipó - Cine Liana” in the virtual exhibition "Critical Zones - Observatories for Earthly Politics" by the ZKM (Zentrum für Kunst und Medien) Karlsruhe.
Recently we mentioned that drowned trees along the Uatumã River a likely the cause for enhanced methane emissions measured at ATTO. Now Angélica Resende and her co-authors investigated how changes in flooding regimes impact tree mortality in floodplains. They compared two sites in the Amazon basin. Along the Jaú River, the floodplain environment is still largely undisturbed. Along the Uatumã near ATTO, on the other hand, the flooding regime has been altered by the implementation of the Balbina hydroelectric plant further upstream.
Santiago Botía and his co-authors analyzed methane in the atmosphere at ATTO. Over the course of five years, they measured methane along with other properties, such as wind speed, wind direction and the stratification of the atmosphere. They noticed frequent pulses of methane emissions during the night, but only under certain conditions. Surprisingly, these nighttime events mostly occurred in the months of July to September – the dry season in the Amazon. Botía et al published the study Open Access in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Issue 20: Understanding nighttime methane signals at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO).
When forests burn those fires produce a lot of smoke. And that smoke usually contains soot, also called “black carbon”. Black carbon particles are aerosols that absorb radiation and as such can warm the Earth’s atmosphere and climate. But we still have much to learn about aerosols, their properties, and distribution in the atmosphere. One of those things is the question of how black carbon emitted from biomass burning in Africa (i.e. forests, grasslands, savannas etc.) is transported across the Atlantic and into the Amazon basin, and what role it plays there. Bruna Holanda and her co-authors tackled this in their new study published in ACP.
The April newsletter includes a few important announcements, including one about the plans for this year's ATTO workshop! All regular formats, such as New Publications and Meet the Team are back of course.

Blog: Voices from the Amazon

Hi, my name is Akima! I studied meteorology at the University of Frankfurt. But back then I realized that I would love to work in the field instead of only sitting at my desk. When I was looking for options after graduation, there was an opportunity to participate in the ATTO project. I thought this was a fantastic chance to combine my background with exciting fieldwork and so I became PhD student at MPI-C in Mainz.
I’m Eliane Gomes-Alves. I have been working at ATTO since 2015 with measurements of plant emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). To sample VOC emissions, we use equipment that was originally developed to measure gas exchanges between the air and plant leaves. It is called IRGA – infrared gas analyzer.
My name is Andrew Crozier and I have been the Site Engineer in the ATTO project for the last 6 years. Now my time with the ATTO project is coming to a close. And though I am saddened to leave it, I will always be grateful for the life-changing experiences I have had while connected with it.
My name is Sebastian and I am a biologist participating in the ATTO project since 2017. At the moment I am working on my master thesis on "Bioaerosol emission patterns of tropical fungi in the Amazon”Bioaerosols are particles in the atmosphere originating from a biological source, for example fungal spores, bacteria and viruses. The fungal spores are what interests our research team. Together with multiple colleagues, in particular Nina Löbs and Cybelli Barbosa, I developed a measurement setup, with which we can quantify and analyze fungal particle emissions in the field and in the lab.
The news reaching us from Brazil, and in particular from Manaus, these days are very grim. On behalf of the ATTO partners from Germany and elsewhere, I would like to express our concern and support for our colleagues in Brazil.
Hello everyone, my name is Pedro. I am a biologist and a lover of the world of plants. I first realized this during my undergrad. As an intern at the Institute of Botany of São Paulo, I participated in an ozone bio-monitoring project. Basically, it was all about exposing sensitive plants to this pollutant, ozone, in several locations around an oil refinery. After a few days of exposure, I looked at the leaves and checked if and to what degree they have injured due to the ozone.