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Welcome to our website for ATTO, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory – an Amazon research project.

This research site is located in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, about 150 km north of Manaus. It is run together by scientists from Germany and Brazil. Its aim is to continuously record meteorological, chemical and biological data, such as the concentration of greenhouses gases. With the help of these data, we hope to gain insights into how the Amazon interacts with the overlying atmosphere and the soil below. Because this region is of such importance to the global climate, it is vital to get a better understanding of these complex processes. Only then will we be able to make more accurate climate predictions.

Have a look around on our website to learn more about the research performed at ATTO and in labs and offices around the world. Please note that the website is still under constructions and more content will be added. So be sure to check back soon! You can also follow us on Social Media to get an insight into the daily lives of the ATTO scientists and stay up-to-date on all the latest news and events!

Latest News

Polari Corrêa and his co-authors analyzed the atmospheric dynamics in and above the forest canopy during one particular night at ATTO. Those conditions changed throughout the night. Turbulence was followed by the formation of a gravity wave and a low-level jet. It was likely formed due to the breeze from the Uatumã River and the hilly terrain. The study highlights the complex dynamics and mechanisms in the atmosphere above a dense forest.

Latest Blog

Hello, I am Adriana Simonetti. I just finished my Master in Tropical Forest Sciences at the National Institute for Amazon Research (INPA). I quantified canopy gaps in the Amazon from aerial photographs collected during repeated drone flights. I deeveloped this techinque in the scope of the ATTO project, under the supervision of Dr Daniel Marra.

News

Dear ATTO researchers, please save the week of October 4 -8, 2021 for the ATTO workshop. We will meet virtually over 3-5 half days (Brazilian mornings/German afternoons). The focus of the workshop will be on poster presentations and discussion groups.

The newsletter for June 2021 is here! The current issue includes summaries for lots of new publications, information about our new ATTO seminar and tools and resources for the project members, as well as many of our regular formats.

Bioaerosols may act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, thereby influencing the formation of clouds and precipitation. But so far there is less knowledge about the ice nucleation activity of each bioaerosol group and atmospheric models hitherto have not differentiated between them. Patade et al. created a new empirical parameterization for five groups of bioaerosols, based on analysis of the characteristics of bioaerosols at ATTO: fungal spores, bacteria, pollen, plant/animal/viral detritus, and algae. This makes it possible for any cloud model to access the role of an individual group of bioaerosols in altering cloud properties and precipitation formation.

Ramsay et al. developed a new model to assess nitrogen exchange between atmosphere and biosphere based on observations at ATTO. This model includes parameters controlling both nitrogen deposition and emissions in tropical forests.

A new study shows that tree growth of Nectandra amazonum (Lauraceae) in the Central Amazonian floodplains does not respond to the annual long-term flooding but to variation of minimum temperature and evapotranspiration.

Biogenic volatile organic compounds remove OH from the atmosphere through chemical reactions, which affects processes such as cloud formation. In a new study, Pfannerstill et al. reveal the important contributions of previously not-considered BVOCs species and underestimated OVOCs to the total OH reactivity.

Blog: Voices from the Amazon

Hi everybody, my name is Carolina. Since recently, I am a Ph.D. student in the workgroup “Radical measurements” of Hartwig Harder in the atmospheric chemistry department at Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz.

My name is Ingrid Chanca and I am a physicist. I am currently pursuing my PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, in Jena, Germany and the Universidade Federal Fluminense, in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro. For my research, I am particularly interested in radiocarbon. To be able to measure radiocarbon in air samples, I have built the GASPS, a Gas Samples’ Purification System.

Hi there, my name is Renato Braghiere! I’m a climatologist and global ecologist at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and I have worked on the ATTO project during my MSc degree from 2011 to 2013. I grew up in the countryside of the state of São Paulo in Brazil amid the trees, and from my early years, I’ve been curious about how nature works and how we connect with nature in so many different ways.

My name is Maryam and I am currently working as a research data manager at MPI-BGC. I have a background in geophysics and lots of prior experience with data management so that I can now take care of the ATTO data portal.

Hello everyone, my name is Frederik Lange. I started recently as a Ph.D. student at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena. Here, I work in the Molecular Biogeochemistry group with Gerd Gleixner as my supervisor.

Hello everyone, my name is Jeová Ramos da Silva Junior. I am a meteorologist and had my first contact with ATTO at the beginning of my master’s degree in 2017. During this period, I investigated how biomass burning might affect photosynthesis inside the canopy of the Amazon Rainforest.