Welcome

Welcome to our website for ATTO, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory – an Amazon research project.

This research site is located in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, about 150 km north of Manaus. It is run together by scientists from Germany and Brazil. Its aim is to continuously record meteorological, chemical and biological data, such as the concentration of greenhouses gases. With the help of these data, we hope to gain insights into how the Amazon interacts with the overlying atmosphere and the soil below. Because this region is of such importance to the global climate, it is vital to get a better understanding of these complex processes. Only then will we be able to make more accurate climate predictions.

Have a look around on our website to learn more about the research performed at ATTO and in labs and offices around the world. Please note that the website is still under constructions and more content will be added. So be sure to check back soon! You can also follow us on Social Media to get an insight into the daily lives of the ATTO scientists and stay up-to-date on all the latest news and events!

New Publication: biodiversity of microorganisms within aerosols of the Amazon rainforest

It is well established that aerosols are relevant for the climate, for example, because they contribute to cloud formation. However, natural, biological aerosols emitted by plants serve another important purpose. They help disperse living microorganisms across the globe, affecting their distribution. Yet little is known about those bioaerosols emitted by pristine forests such as the Amazon. And even less about the diversity of the microorganisms in the aerosols.

Felipe Souza and co-authors now collected bioaerosols at our ATTO site. Then they extracted and analyzed the DNA to determine the communities present. This is the first study which described the community of microorganisms within aerosols in the Amazon. They found many different types of bacteria and fungi. Some were cosmopolitan taxa, but they also identified many that are specific to certain environments such as soil or water. This suggests that the atmosphere may act as an important gateway for bacteria to be exchanged between plants, soil, and water.

Their results also reveal that the main source for bioaerosols emitted from the Amazon rainforest are organisms that are known to disperse their spores through the atmosphere: fungi and bacteria. We know that these groups of organisms can produce enzymes and metabolites including antibiotics. Finding them in the vast jungle wilderness of the Amazon, however, is difficult. Analyzing forest aerosols may be a way to localize them for the potential use in biotechnological applications. 

Souza et al. published this paper as a Short Communication in Science of the Total Environment.

Graphic Abstract from Souza et al. (2019)

New Publication: Inertial Sublayer over the Amazon Rainforest?

The Amazon rainforest interacts with the atmosphere by exchanging many substances. Many of these, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ozone, and organic compounds, are produced by the vegetation. They are very influential in both the regional and global climates. Until now, the estimates of their emission and absorption rates are based on classical theories. But those were developed over relatively short vegetation and are valid for the so-called the “inertial sublayer.”

Cléo Quaresma Dias‐Júnior and co-authors now checked if such an inertial sublayer even exists over the Amazon, where trees grow much higher. With an average tree height of some 40 meters, they expected it at around 100 meter above the forest floor.

They measured a number of atmospheric parameters that typically change between layers at different heights of the ATTO 80m tower and the Tall Tower. However, they found no evidence that such an inertial sublayer exists. Instead the roughness sublayer (the layer directly above the surface) directly merges with the convective mixed layer above. Crucially, this means that new methods and theories will be needed to address the absence of the inertial sublayer to improve the estimates of fluxes over the Amazon rainforest.

The paper was recently published in Geophysical Research Letters: 10.1029/2019GL083237

ATTO Meeting 2019

We’re excited to announce that this year our annual ATTO meeting takes place on September 16-18 and will be hosted by INPA in Manaus.

The meeting is open to all consortium member and invited guests and we can’t wait to see everyone there! The focus of the meeting will be scientific exchange. We will share progress on ongoing projects, discuss upcoming ones and perhaps even find new collaborators. Therefore, we will dedicate a considerable portion of the meeting time to posters.

We will announce more details on schedule, program and logistics shortly so stay tuned and save the date!

Newsletter #2

We just released the second ATTO newsletter. It features new team members, the big ATTO presence at the EGU 2019, infrastructure updates at the site and more.

To receive the newsletter, please subscribe to our mailing list, subscribe to the RSS feed or follow us on social media. All newsletters will be archived here on the website as well.

Enjoy reading!