HIGH-Tech: Gas Samples Purification System for radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2

My name is Ingrid Chanca and I am a physicist. I am currently pursuing my PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, in Jena, Germany and the Universidade Federal Fluminense, in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro. For my research, I am particularly interested in radiocarbon. To be able to measure radiocarbon in air samples, I have built the GASPS, a Gas Samples’ Purification System.

Making sense of Teflon spaghetti: The Comparative Reactivity instrument

My name is Eva Pfannerstill, and I studied OH reactivity in different environments, including the Amazon rainforest. When I first opened the lid of the Comparative Reactivity instrument, I felt like looking at a bowl of Teflon spaghetti: The dozens of thin tubes, valves and mass flow controllers inside make up a confusing network for gas flows and reactions. Its purpose is the measurement of the so-called total OH reactivity. The OH reactivity tells us how much hydroxyl (OH) radicals are lost per unit of time in ambient air.

Cloud radar: Measuring from a “hole” in the forest

Hello! My name is Camila Lopes. I’m a meteorologist working in the ATTO Project since 2020. It is part of my Ph.D. studies at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, under the supervision of Prof. Rachel Albrecht. I’m involved in a project to study the lifecycle of clouds and aerosols in the Amazon by measuring their properties in several locations. One of these locations includes the ATTO Tower and a new site assembled about 4-km away from the tower. The site is called “Campina”, which means “meadow” in Portuguese.