New publication on aerosols in the Amazon

Scientists from our Aerosol group published a new “Long-term study on coarse mode aerosols in the Amazon rainforest with the frequent intrusion of Saharan dust plumes”.

They analyzed the coarse fraction of aerosols (those that are at least 1 micrometer in diameter) every 5 minutes for over 3 years and were surprised to find that over this period the size and abundance of these “large” aerosol particles remained fairly constant. In contrast, the smaller aerosols are heavily influenced by the seasonal occurrence of smoke from fires. This coarse fraction, however, is mainly comprised of aerosols derived from the rainforest itself (such as pollen). That pattern only changes during the wet season (December through April), when Saharan dust, sea salt particles from the Atlantic and smoke from fires in Africa episodically make their way to the Amazon. Especially in February and March, pulses of African aerosols become so frequent they are the norm rather than the exception. Our scientists then used these data to estimate how much dust is deposited in the ATTO region each year: 5-10 kg per hectare, or 0.5-1 g per square meter.

You can read the full study by lead author Daniel Moran-Zuloaga in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Issue 18. It is published Open Access and thus freely available online. The data set is also available for further analysis (see publication for details)!

 

 

Welcome

Welcome to our website for ATTO, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory – an Amazon research project.

This research site is located in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil, about 150 km north of Manaus. It is run together by scientists from Germany and Brazil. Its aim is to continuously record meteorological, chemical and biological data, such as the concentration of greenhouses gases. With the help of these data, we hope to gain insights into how the Amazon interacts with the overlying atmosphere and the soil below. Because this region is of such importance to the global climate, it is vital to get a better understanding of these complex processes. Only then will we be able to make more accurate climate predictions.

Have a look around on our website to learn more about the research performed at ATTO and in labs and offices around the world. Please note that the website is still under constructions and more content will be added. So be sure to check back soon! You can also follow us on Social Media to get an insight into the daily lives of the ATTO scientists and stay up-to-date on all the latest news and events!